I’m also ‘A man without a country”

Thank you Mr. Vonnegut.

A Man Without a CountryA Man Without a Country by Kurt Vonnegut

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

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I absolutely love reading Kurt Vonnegut- he’s always been a personal hero of mine. This last book he wrote just before he died was a much needed relief during the Bush 2 administration when we were indulging jingoism, world domination, cultural hegemony and raping and pillaging each other here and abroad in the wake of the 9/11 attacks. It was so comforting to me to realize my ethical views and judgements of my fellow ‘Americans’ weren’t outlandish, wrong and potentially evil. Mr. Vonnegut- my life wouldn’t have been bearable if I hadn’t stumbled on your writings for the first time when I was around ten or eleven years old- you were an amazing person!

Magnettic

Magnetic Horror

“Beneath this sky, so livid and strange,

Tormented like thy destiny,
What thoughts within thy spirit range
Themselves?—O libertine reply.”

—With vain desires, for ever torn
Towards the uncertain, and the vast,
And yet, like Ovid—I’ll not mourn—
Who from his Roman Heaven was cast.

O heavens, turbulent as the streams,
In you I mirror forth my pride!
Your clouds, which clad in mourning, glide,

Are the hearses of my dreams,
And in your illusion lies the hell,
Wherein my heart delights to dwell.

From THE FLOWERS OF EVIL

TRANSLATED INTO ENGLISH VERSE BY CYRIL SCOTT

Available at Project Gutenberg:  https://www.gutenberg.org/files/36098/36098-h/36098-h.htm

~~This work by Philip J. Chartrand is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.“

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This work by Philip J. Chartrand is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

Obsession

Darkness

Great forests, you alarm me like a mighty fane;

Like organ-tones you roar, and in our hearts of stone,
Where ancient sobs vibrate, O halls of endless pain!
The answering echoes of your “De Profundis” moan.

I hate thee, Ocean! hate thy tumults and thy throbs,
My spirit finds them in himself. This bitter glee
Of vanquished mortals, full of insults and of sobs,
I hear it in the mighteous laughter of the sea.

O starless night! thy loveliness my soul inhales,
Without those starry rays which speak a language known,
For I desire the dark, the naked and the lone.

But e’en those darknesses themselves to me are veils,
Where live—and, by the millions ‘neath my eyelids prance,
Long, long departed Beings with familiar glance.

From

THE FLOWERS OF EVIL

TRANSLATED INTO ENGLISH VERSE BY CYRIL SCOTT

Available at Project Gutenberg:  https://www.gutenberg.org/files/36098/36098-h/36098-h.htm

~~This work by Philip J. Chartrand is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.“

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This work by Philip J. Chartrand is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

DSC_4568_meditation

Meditation by Charles Baudelaire

 Be wise, O my Woe, seek thy grievance to drown,

Thou didst call for the night, and behold it is here,
An atmosphere sombre, envelopes the town,
To some bringing peace and to others a care.

Whilst the manifold souls of the vile multitude,
‘Neath the lash of enjoyment, that merciless sway,
Go plucking remorse from the menial brood,
From them far, O my grief, hold my hand, come this way.

Behold how they beckon, those years, long expired,
From Heaven, in faded apparel attired,
How Regret, smiling, foams on the waters like yeast;

Its arches of slumber the dying sun spreads,
And like a long winding-sheet dragged to the East,
Oh, hearken Beloved, how the Night softly treads!

From

THE FLOWERS OF EVIL

TRANSLATED INTO ENGLISH VERSE BY CYRIL SCOTT

Available at Project Gutenberg:  https://www.gutenberg.org/files/36098/36098-h/36098-h.htm

~~This work by Philip J. Chartrand is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.“

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This work by Philip J. Chartrand is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.
;

Emily and Annabelle 2015

Cats by CHARLES BAUDELAIRE

All ardent lovers and all sages prize,

—As ripening years incline upon their brows—
The mild and mighty cats—pride of the house—
That like unto them are indolent, stern and wise.

The friends of Learning and of Ecstasy,
They search for silence and the horrors of gloom;
The devil had used them for his steeds of Doom,
Could he alone have bent their pride to slavery.

When musing, they display those outlines chaste,
Of the great sphinxes—stretched o’er the sandy waste,
That seem to slumber deep in a dream without end:

From out their loins a fountainous furnace flies,
And grains of sparkling gold, as fine as sand,
Bestar the mystic pupils of their eyes.

Annabelle

Annabelle

Emily

Emily

~~This work by Philip J. Chartrand is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.“

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This work by Philip J. Chartrand is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.
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A Walk By the Charles

Finality broods upon the things that pass:
Persuaded by this air, the trump of doom
Might hang unsounded while the autumn gloom
Darkens the leaf and smokes the river’s glass.
For nothing so susceptible to death
But on this forenoon seems to hold its breath:
The silent single oarsmen on the stream
Are always young, are rowers in a dream.
The lovers underneath the chestnut tree,
Though love is over, stand bemused to see
The season falling where no fall could be.

You oarsmen, when you row beyond the bend,
Will see the river winding to its end.
Lovers that hold the chestnut burr in hand
Will speak at last of death, will understand,
Foot-deep amid the ruinage of the year,
What smell it is that stings the gathering air.

From our evasions we are brought at last,
From all our hopes of faithfulness, to cast
One look of recognition at the sky,
The unimportant leaves that flutter by.
Why else upon this bank are we so still?
What lends us anchor but the mutable?
O lovers! Let the bridge of your two hands
Be broken like the mirrored bridge that bends
And shivers on the surface of the stream.
Young oarsmen, who in timeless gesture seem
Continuous, united with the tide,
Leave off your bending to the oar, and glide
Past innocence, beyond these aging bricks,
To where the Charles flows in to join the Styx.

Adrienne Rich
DSC_4740

James P. Kelleher Rose Garden

~~This work by Philip J. Chartrand is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.“

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This work by Philip J. Chartrand is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.
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20150530-18

THE PROGRESSE OF THE SOULE

First Song.

I.

I SING the progresse of a deathlesse soule, 

Whom Fate, which God made, but doth not controule,

Plac’d in most shapes; all times before the law

Yoak’d us, and when, and since, in this I sing.

    And the great world to his aged evening;

From infant morne, through manly noone I draw.

What the gold Chaldee, or silver Persian saw,

Greeke brasse, or Roman iron, is in this one;

A worke t’outweare Seths pillars, bricke and stone,

And (holy writt excepted) made to yeeld to none.

II.

Thee, eye of heaven, this great Soule envies not,

By thy male force, is all wee have, begot.

In the first East, thou now beginst to shine,

Suck’st early balme, and Iland spices there,

And wilt anon in thy loose-rein’d careere

At Tagus, Po, Sene, Thames, and Danow dine,

And see at night thy Westerne land of Myne,

Yet hast thou not more nations seene then shee,

That before thee, one day beganne to bee,

And thy fraile light being quench’d, shall long, long out live thee.

Adverse Childhood Experiences and the Lifelong Consequences of Trauma

Many people can identify a person in their lives who struggles with a chronic illness like heart disease, diabetes, or hypertension. Most people also know someone who struggles with mental illness, substance abuse, or relationships in general. Traditionally, the health care system would point to high-risk behaviors such as poor diet, drug use, or a sedentary lifestyle as the primary causal factors. Questions for patients have focused on “What’s wrong with you?” rather than “What happened to you?” A 1998 study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Kaiser Permanente is leading to a paradigm shift in the medical community’s approach to disease. This study of more than 17,000 middle-class Americans documented quite clearly that adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) can contribute significantly to negative adult physical and mental health outcomes and affect more than 60% of adults.1,2 This continuesto be reaffirmed with more recent studies.

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