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Word of the Day – recursion – July 7, 2014

re·cur·sion

[ri-kur-zhuhn]

noun Mathematics, Computers.

the process of defining a function or calculating a number by the repeated application of an algorithm.

Origin:

1925–30; < Late Latin recursiōn- (stem of recursiō ) a running back, equivalent to recurs ( us ) (see recourse) + -iōn- -ion

recursionRecursion is the process of repeating items in a self-similar way. For instance, when the surfaces of two mirrors are exactly parallel with each other the nested images that occur are a form of infinite recursion. The term has a variety of meanings specific to a variety of disciplines ranging from linguistics to logic. The most common application of recursion is in mathematics and computer science, in which it refers to a method of defining functions in which the function being defined is applied within its own definition. Specifically this defines an infinite number of instances (function values), using a finite expression that for some instances may refer to other instances, but in such a way that no loop or infinite chain of references can occur. The term is also used more generally to describe a process of repeating objects in a self-similar way.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recursion

Recursion

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Recursion by Phil Chartrand is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at http://philchartrand.com/blog.

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incogitant_h

Word of the Day – incogitant – July 3, 2014

incogitant

Definition of INCOGITANT

: thoughtless, inconsiderate

Origin of INCOGITANT

Latin incogitant-, incogitans, from in- + cogitant-, cogitans, present participle of cogitare to cogitate

First Known Use: 1628

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Word of the Day by http://philchartrand.com/ is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at http://philchartrand.com/.

desuetude_h.jpg

Word of the Day – desuetude – July 2, 2014

desuetude

DEFINITION OF de·sue·tude

: discontinuance from use or exercise : disuse

PRONUNCIATION

\ˈde-swi-ˌtüd, -ˌtyüd, di-ˈsü-ə-, -ˈsyü-\

EXAMPLES

<despite the long years of desuetude, the old manual typewriter seemed to work just fine>

Origin of DESUETUDE

Middle English dissuetude, from Latin desuetudo, from desuescere to become unaccustomed, from de- + suescere to become accustomed; akin to Latin sodalis comrade — more at sib

First Known Use: 15th century

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/desuetude

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Word of the Day by http://philchartrand.com/ is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at http://philchartrand.com/.

 

 

Quote

Quote of the Day – July 3, 2014

FRONTLINE

Faith and Doubt at Ground Zero

FRONTLINE by PBS is one of my favorite documentary news shows.  Shortly after 9/11 they did a segment exploring how individual’s were changed by the event.  Many in-depth interviews with scholars and witnesses were prepared and the segment as well as additional resources were made available on their website @ http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/faith/questions/

There are a lot of challenging questions to consider for anyone who was changed by the events of that terrible day in our history.

The most significant interview from my perspective was with Ann Ulanov.  Her website is located here:  http://www.utsnyc.edu/faculty/faculty-directory/ann-ulanov?

The interview which aired shortly after the 9/11 attacks was perhaps the first cogent and believable description I was able to accept which describes Evil as a force beyond our individual psyche’s unaided ability to defeat.  The key quotes from this segment are below.

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asseverate_h

Word of the Day – asseverate – July 1, 2014

asseverate


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Pronunciation:  as·sev·er·ate \ə-ˈse-və-ˌrāt\


Definition:

transitive verb
:  to affirm or declare positively or earnestly \<he always asseverated that he did not know — G. K. Chesterton\>


from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition
transitive v. To declare seriously or positively; affirm.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License
v. To declare earnestly, seriously, or positively; to affirm.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English
transitive v. To affirm or aver positively, or with solemnity.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
To affirm or aver positively, or with solemnity.


— as·sev·er·a·tion noun
— as·sev·er·a·tive adjective


Origin:

Latin asseveratus, past participle of asseverare, from ad- +severus severe
First Known Use: 1749

[1]: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/asseverate

[2]: https://www.wordnik.com/words/asseverate